â€œHenry County and The Korean Conflict (War) 1950-1953â€�
The United States became involved in the Korean Conflict as a product of the Cold War between the
Soviet Union, China , and the United States.  The United Nations force that was sent to keep the
peace between North Korea (communist) and South Korea (democratic).  The United States sent
forces under the command of General Douglas MacArthur , hero of WWII in the Pacific Theater
against the Empire of Japan.  This conflict grew into a massive battle front between the known large
powers.
And as well the men of Henry  County  were involved in this conflict too.  There were too many to
name and many are still with us today.  General MacArthur had an open disagreement with
Washington and President Truman on how to handle the war and he was replaced by General
Ridgway.  This was political suicide for President Truman to relive Gen. MacArthur’s command.  
He was beloved in America and the citizens didn’t like how he was treated.  He would speak
before Congress.
The 38th Parallel was set as the line between North and South.  The war raged with names like
Punchbowl, Bloody Ridge, and Heartbreak Ridge. The time for an end was called and prisoner
exchanges were made and a demilitarized zone was created at the 38th parallel.  In all, the Korean
Conflict took a heavy toll on the United States.  The losses for the U.S. alone were 33, 629 dead,
103, 284 wounded, and 5, 178 missing or captured.  The bulk of these casualties occurred during the
first year of fighting.  There were 37 months of fighting.  And today we still have a large military force
in South Korea guarding the demilitarized zone.  Again the men and women of Henry County still serve
At this post in far off Korea.

References:
1. The Army Historical Records, Office of the Chief of Military History, Washington DC.

                â€œKorean Warâ€�
“In the cold lonely mountains of Korea, our men fought and died to keep a rampant nation from
sliding into further domination by an Empire of evil to the north.  We fought until a stalemate was
reached.  And even today our your men and women walk a post to keep that evil from spreading
South.  May God protect those on watch in a zone of danger so far from home.â€�
                                                    The Staff at the CRG